High

Last night, I went to the High Museum of Art with some friends for the first time. My favorites from the European Art Exhibit were the impressionistic paintings of Monet and Maximilien Luce.

In the American Art Exhibit, I enjoyed these pieces by Hale Woodruff and Thornton Dial. Here’s some insight on Dial’s Green Pastures: The Birds That Didn’t Learn How to Fly:

The painting is a historical heartbreak. One of a series, it shows figures of birds constructed from work gloves hanging on a line, a reference to the historical atrocities that people of color have endured in the U.S. … In the background is a “green, enigmatic field of color,” Cubbs said. That, along with the piece’s title, makes reference to Psalm 23:2, which speaks of comfort and relief from suffering in “green pastures.” Cubbs called it “a Biblical reference to the world beyond physical and historical adversity, and the final place of redemption for those who suffer oppression in this world.”

In the Modern Art Exhibit, my favorite piece was this satellite shaped collage of mirror fragments. I was so enthralled by it that I never picked up its title or artist. As you would you move closer toward it, you would see hundreds of fragmented versions of your reflection combining into a giant reflection. It has also had an acoustical phenomenon because of its angular curve. Someone could be standing several feet away from you, but if you saw their fragmented reflection in the mirrors and they made so much as a whisper, you could hear it as if they were in your face. Truly fascinating.

I also captured a video of it.

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